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Florida Memory provides free online access to historical documents, photographs, films and audio recordings from the State Library and Archives of Florida.

Check out our other Tumblr blog http://smilewithfloridamemory.tumblr.com.

Preserving the Sounds of the Sunshine State

Today, we are highlighting one of the State Archives’ exciting endeavors: audio digitization.

Since 2003 the State Archives has digitized thousands of audio recordings in the Florida Folklife Collection. The goal of this effort is to preserve Florida’s folk culture and make it accessible to educators, researchers, and Florida folk enthusiasts around the world. The Collection includes interviews, field recordings and performances gathered by folklorists from the Florida Folklife Program and recordings from the Florida Folk Festival dating back to 1954.

Learn more in today’s blog: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/29/preserving-the-sounds-of-the-sunshine-state

18 hours ago
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The Tyranny of Patent Medicines

If you’ve ever suffered from a clogged liver, blood in need of purifying, or an undernourished brain, this is the blog for you: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/27/the-tyranny-of-patent-medicines

2 days ago
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Voting in Florida, Then and Now

On March 3, 1845, the U.S. admitted Florida as the 27th state in the Union.  A proclamation was issued for a statewide election to be held on May 26, 1845, in which citizens would elect a Governor, a member of the United States Congress, seventeen state senators, and forty-one state representatives.

Read the full blog here: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/25/voting-in-florida-then-and-now

4 days ago
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This film shows the “Save The Historic Capitol Night.” It shows the interior of the old Capitol, along with such political figures as Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner, Attorney General Robert Shevin, Insurance Commissioner Bill Gunter and Secretary of State Bruce Smathers. Produced by WFSU-TV.

See the full video here: floridamemory.com/items/show/253432

1 week ago
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Saint Augustine Map, 1589
Learn more about this significant document: floridamemory.com/exhibits/floridahighlights/mapstaug

Saint Augustine Map, 1589

Learn more about this significant document: floridamemory.com/exhibits/floridahighlights/mapstaug

(Source: floridamemory.com)

1 week ago
13 notes
Land Grant from the Upper Creeks, Lower Creeks and Seminoles to Thomas Brown (March 1, 1783)

This document, found among records related to Fatio v. Dewees (1838), represents an enclosure originally submitted by H. Lee IV to Florida territorial judge Augustus Brevoort Woodward in September 1824. Lee sought Woodward’s assistance in securing claim to property purchased by his father, General Henry Lee, from Thomas Brown in 1817. 

1 day ago
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Women’s Equality Day

Today Florida joins the rest of the United States in celebrating Women’s Equality Day, an officially designated day observing two anniversaries in the history of women’s rights. Today is the 94th anniversary of the enactment of the 19th amendment, which struck down the limitation of suffrage on the basis of sex. It is also the 44th anniversary of the 1970 Women’s Strike for Equality, organized by the National Organization for Women (NOW) and its president at that time, Betty Friedan.

Learn more in today’s blog: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/26/womens-equality-day-2

3 days ago
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Not Our First Rodeo

Lots of people associate the idea of a rodeo with the American West – Texas, Oklahoma, someplace dusty, hot, and dotted with cacti. And while rodeo is most certainly a big hit out west, it has deep roots here in the Sunshine State as well. Florida, after all, has been home to a thriving cattle industry for centuries. Native Americans and the Spanish were raising cows as early as the 1500s, long before organized ranching arrived in what would become known as the American West. As new settlers arrived and the era of Spanish ownership came to an end, the herds remained, changed hands many times, and continued to serve as a valuable source of food and trade.

Learn more in today’s blog: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/22/not-our-first-rodeo

1 week ago
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Gospel to Go: Circuit Riders on the Florida Frontier

It’s a cool Sunday morning in the sandy scrub of North Florida, with dew still on the ground and the sun just getting up over the trees. It’s 1847. Church is about to start, but it’s nothing like what most of us would think of when we think of church today. There is no church building; there’s only an arbor to shield the worshipers from the sun, a few crude benches, and a space at the front for the preacher. Moreover, the preacher arrives on his horse just before the service is to begin, because he does not live in the same community as his congregants. In fact, this is only one of half a dozen settlements he will visit in the course of a month.

Learn more in today’s blog: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/20/gospel-to-go-circuit-riders-on-the-florida-frontier

1 week ago
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Florida’s Own Billy the Kid

Many people may not be aware but at the turn of the century, Florida had its very own Billy the Kid. And while he wasn’t a rustler or robber, he was a train-hopping rogue active in the Fort McCoy area who garnered attention for his activities on the Ocklawaha Valley Railroad between Ocala and Palatka in Marion County.

Read the full blog here: floridamemory.com/blog/2014/08/18/floridas-own-billy-the-kid

1 week ago
3 notes